Special Issue: “Women of the Press in the 1890s”

Article Deadline: June 1, 2017

The Victorians Journal of Culture and Literature is announcing a special issue on “Women of the Press in the 1890s,” in conjunction with the International Centre for Victorian Women Writers (ICVWW) series of initiatives designed to reassess women writers and their contributions from Brontë to Bloomsbury. The volume will be guest edited by Clare Horrocks and Alyson Hunt. Please direct questions and submissions of 5000-6000 words to C.L.Horrocks@ljmu.ac.uk, a.hunt@kent.ac.uk, and deborah.logan@wku.edu. Deadline for submission: June 1, 2017. Date of notification: August 1, 2017. Publication: Fall, 2017.

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“Gender and Genre,” Victorian Poetry Special Issue

Deadline for essay submission: September 18, 2017

Journal Venue: Victorian Poetry, Summer 2019

CFP from VICTORIA Listserv

We are seeking essays for a special issue of Victorian Poetry devoted to the theme of “Gender and Genre,” which will appear in Summer 2019.

The critical recovery of once-neglected women poets that took place at the end of the twentieth century changed the landscape of Victorian Studies. Literary-historical accounts of Victorian poetry, once dominated by men, were revised and enriched as the scope and variety of women’s achievements came to light. That feminist undertaking has been further advanced by scholars who reveal fresh aspects of the poetic landscape by juxtaposing men’s and women’s writing. This special issue seeks to build on such cross-gender projects by calling for essays that construct dialogues between works by male and female Victorian poets who write in the same genre. How does gender shape formal and thematic approaches to specific genres – to (for instance) the lyric, the epic, the dramatic monologue, the modern ballad? By nature, this project is exploratory, experimental, and diagnostic; it requires a choice of poems that aspire to stand as representative as they open new lines of thinking about gender and genre. Continue reading

“Screening the Victorians in the Twenty-First Century”

Abstract Deadline: March 15, 2016

Articles, if accepted due: October 15, 2016

CFP from VICTORIA List-serv

2017 Special Issue of Neo-Victorian Studies

Despite frequent predictions of their disappearance, appropriations of the Victorian era never quite seem to leave our film, television and computer screens. Indeed, in popular prime-time viewing from Doctor Who (2005-) to Sherlock (2010-) and Penny Dreadful (2014-), and in cinematic blockbusters such as Sweeney Todd (2007), Sherlock Holmes (2009) and Crimson Peak (2015), the Victorians remain a particularly visible part of present-day culture. This special issue will explore recent popular screen Victoriana ‘for the masses’ and the politics of its production, distribution, audience reception and consumption. We seek contributions that engage with the breadth of screen media, from big-budget film and television series produced by the likes of the BBC and Showtime to online web-series created by small production companies and non-professionals. How has screen Victoriana developed since the millennium? How might we address questions of neo-Victorianism’s periodization via the film medium? In a time when transnational co-production is increasingly common, how important are national origins and audiences in shaping neo-Victorianism on screen? What ‘sells’ these myriad moving images of the nineteenth century? Wherein resides their distinctive appeal and what meanings, values, and affects do audiences invest therein? Possible topics could include but are by no means limited to:

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“Transatlanticism and The Blithedale Romance”

Abstract Deadline: March 15, 2016

Full Essay Deadline, upon acceptance: July 15, 2016

CFP Link

A special issue of the Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, Spring 2017

Guest editors: Derek Pacheco and Michael Demson

We invite submissions that address all aspects of “Transatlanticism and The Blithedale Romance.”

In The Blithedale Romance, Hawthorne famously derides Brook Farm’s utopianism by likening it to Charles Fourier’s outlandish prophecies of seas-transmuted-into-“limonade à cèdre.” For all its satire, however, the novel is positively awash, so to speak, in British and European literary, social, and intellectual currents—from pastoral aesthetics, to prison reform, to fantasies of agricultural improvement, to name a few. For example, Hawthorne’s wry allusion to Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey’s unrealized utopian Pantisocracy opens up questions about the extent to which he understood his own experience of Brook Farm in terms of the agrarian thought permeating transatlantic Romanticism. Indeed, that such preoccupations would drift across the Atlantic ocean’s temporal and geographic expanses exemplifies what Elisa Tamarkin has called the “irreducible ‘fluidity’ of the Atlantic world.” In what further and diverse ways, then, can we consider The Blithdale Romance as a novel of the Atlantic world?

Abstracts of approximately 300-500 words by 15 March 2016 with a two-page cv (please send to demson@shsu.edu). Full essays (6,000-9,000 words) would be due by 15 July 2016.

Please address any questions to dpacheco@purdue.edu or demson@shsu.edu

‘Gender in Victorian Popular Fiction, Art, and Culture’

Deadline: April 30, 2016

CFP from VICTORIA Listserv

Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies is a peer-reviewed, online journal committed to publishing insightful and innovative scholarship on gender studies and nineteenth-century British literature, art and culture.

This special issue invites articles on all aspects of the relationship between gender and the “popular”. Popular fiction in the nineteenth century was repeatedly, and often negatively, associated with women and femininity, perceived as a mass of “silly novels by lady novelists” (George Eliot). Existing scholarship (by critics such as Solveig R. Robinson and Jennifer Phegley) has already done much to challenge the old Victorian notion that popular fiction was second-rate literature produced by a second-class gender. We seek papers that will reassess or reinvigorate the relationship between popular fiction and the feminine, but also work that goes beyond this in order to interrogate the interactions between gender and popular genres more broadly. Thus, we encourage engagement with masculinity studies and queer theory, as well as other popular genres, such as magazines, newspapers and other periodical publications, the penny bloods, gothic fictions, detective fiction, fads and fashions, and theatrical engagements. We also welcome submissions that consider gender and sexuality in conjunction with race, class, place and nationality.  Continue reading

Special Issue: “Screening the Victorians in the Twenty-First Century”

Deadline for Abstracts: March 15, 2016

Deadline for articles, if accepted: October 15, 2016

CFP Link

2017 special issue of Neo-Victorian Studies

Despite frequent predictions of their disappearance, appropriations of the Victorian era never quite seem to leave our film, television and computer screens. Indeed, in popular prime-time viewing from Doctor Who (2005-) to Sherlock (2010-) and Penny Dreadful (2014-), and in cinematic blockbusters such as Sweeney Todd (2007), Sherlock Holmes (2009) and Crimson Peak (2015), the Victorians remain a particularly visible part of present-day culture. This special issue will explore recent popular screen Victoriana ‘for the masses’ and the politics of its production, distribution, audience reception and consumption. Contributions that engage with the breadth of screen media, from big-budget film and television series produced by the likes of the BBC and Showtime to online web-series created by small production companies and non-professionals are welcome. How has screen Victoriana developed since the millennium? How might we address questions of neo-Victorianism’s periodization via the film medium? In a time when transnational co-production is increasingly common, how important are national origins and audiences in shaping neo-Victorianism on screen? What ‘sells’ these myriad moving images of the nineteenth century? Wherein resides their distinctive appeal and what meanings, values, and affects do audiences invest therein?

Continue reading

“Victorians Journal of Culture and Literature” on the topic of William Shakespeare

Deadline for article submissions: April 1, 2016

Next year, 2016, marks the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare.

Victorians Journal of Culture and Literature invites submissions of new work on Victorian Shakespeare, including literary commentary / criticism, theatrical interpretations, staging and performance, actors and audiences, and the contextualizing of Shakespeare within the era of Britain’s greatest industrial and imperial expansion. How did the “Victorian frame of mind” contribute to and shape our understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare’s writing in the modern and postmodern eras?

Deadline: April 1. Length: 5,000–6,000 words. Please address queries to the editor at deborah.logan@wku.edu.

Thoreau Special Issue, “Nineteenth-Century Prose”

Deadline for proposal: February 1, 2016

Deadline for completed paper: October 1, 2016

CFP Link

In 2017, Nineteenth-Century Prose will publish a special issue in honor of Thoreau’s 200th birthday. Guest editor and Thoreau Society member Richard Schneider invites papers on any aspect of Thoreau’s life and writings.

Please submit brief proposals to him by 1 February 2016 at richard.schneider@wartburg.edu.

Thomas Hardy Association Student Essay Prize

Deadline: August 31, 2016

The Thomas Hardy Association (TTHA) invites submissions from students, on any aspect of Thomas Hardy’s life, work, or reputation, for the 2016 Student Essay Prize Competition. Criteria include:

§  Originality and strong scholarship.  Maybe it’s a study for a thesis chapter.  Maybe it’s a really good and further developed term paper.  Maybe it’s a side project that wouldn’t otherwise see the light of day.

§  Pre-editing by a major professor in the student’s academic department is recommended but not essential: the faculty member’s name would appear in the acknowledgments.

§  Maximum length: 6000 words.

§  Essays will be evaluated by members of The Thomas Hardy Association’s Editorial Board who will rank them and offer a few comments.  Continue reading

“One Green Field: Walking, Landscape, and Ecocriticism”

Deadline for Abstracts: November 30, 2015

CFP Link

Call for Papers for Critical Survey, Autumn 2016 (deadline for abstracts 30 November 2015)

Walking is prominent in recent creative non-fiction in the UK and Ireland. It is hypothesised that this has happened because wayfaring offers unique opportunities for our times. Encounters on foot allow us to observe endangered non-human nature and to reassess undervalued landscapes or environments. If this is true, we should see less walking in pre-modern literature, except in the cases where mystics, misfits, urban rustics and adventurers have found their muse on the hoof, or have a particular affinity with wildlife and wild adventures.  In the case of Early Modern literature, the poet Edward Thomas suggested ‘The century of Pope and Johnson is looked down on for nothing so much as for being townish and for thinking one green field like another. We forget that, nevertheless, their fields were greener than ours, and that they did not neglect them save in poetry’ (1913: 17). Perhaps, rather than being motivated by environmental concern, the popularity of walking literature is due to new prose forms  including the ‘new nature writing’. Perhaps we might even conclude that the literary aspects of such writing have supplanted ‘greener’ forms of engagement.

This call for papers asks for contributions that explore the recent proliferation of walking-based literature, either in terms of the creative and historical developments that have allowed this to take place, or in terms of the unexplored byways that may illuminate our current concerns in terms of broader movements. Walking literature offers a particular openness to hybrid forms and themes, and so this issue of Critical Survey does not limit itself to nature writing nor to rural and pastoral literature. There are no limits to historical or geographical scope, except that the essays should primarily focus on British and Irish works of literature where the act of walking and the non-human landscape are simultaneously prominent. Contributions that cite the body of work known as ‘ecocriticism’ or ‘green studies’ would be particularly useful in potentially opening up new ways to consider both contemporary and historical texts where the landscape and material nature have active roles in the production of the text, and it would be helpful if authors address whether this writing is or can be relevant to environmentalist thought. Since Jonathan Bate’s The Song of the Earth and Romantic Ecology consider the Romantic tradition of green studies, this journal would particularly welcome essays that move beyond these ideas, even if the modern walking text cannot avoid reference to the Romantic traditions. Continue reading

RSVP Bibliography 2013-2015

Call for Contributors

The Research Society for Victorian Periodicals is seeking contributors to its biennial bibliography, which will be published in Victorian Periodicals Review in fall 2016. Contributors to the bibliography are asked to adopt three to ten scholarly journals from a list, identify articles published between December 2013 and December 2015 that have direct relevance to the study of Victorian journalism, and compile a list of annotated entries. All contributors are acknowledged in the published bibliography. Entries will be due May 2, 2016. If you are interested in contributing to this project or can recommend someone, please email biblio @ rs4vp.org for the complete guidelines and list of journals.

“The Brontës and Critical Interventions in Victorian Studies,” Victorian Review

Deadline: December 15, 2015

Special Issue of Victorian Review, “The Brontë’s and Critical Interventions in Victorian Studies”

CFP from BWWC Conference

We invite submissions for a special issue of Victorian Review commemorating the bicentennial of Charlotte Brontë’s birth.  The work of the Brontë sisters has formed the basis of some the most important critical interventions in Victorian studies, and the varying fortunes of the sisters’ works often index dynamic changes in the field of literary studies. This issue aims to explore the role of the Brontë oeuvre in shaping critical debates in Victorian literature and culture and in literary studies more generally, while also showcasing new directions in Brontë studies.

Papers exploring the Brontës through a variety of interdisciplinary lenses (discourse analysis, cultural studies, history, art history, and medicine) and engaging methodological approaches of significance not only to Brontë studies but to Victorian studies more broadly are welcome. Continue reading

“Literature and Tourisms of the Long Nineteenth Century”

Deadline: June 3, 2015

CFP Link

“Literature and Tourisms of the Long Nineteenth Century”
Special Issue of LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory
Guest Editor: Meghan Freeman, Manhattanville College

According to the OED, the word tourism enters the English lexicon at the dawn of the nineteenth century, thus institutionalizing the notion that travel is a necessary component of personal development. As crowds of earnest bourgeois travelers displaced the solitary young aristocrat on the Grand Tour a vast body of literature concerned with both mundane and exalted facets of foreign places cropped up to fulfill a new set of needs.  Owing to the diversity of places to which individuals traveled and the many different reasons for doing so, these needs were diverse and multiform.  So, rather than speak of a monolithic tourism culture, it might be better to contemplate the many different tourisms that emerged from and developed over the course of the long nineteenth century (defined here as approximately 1789-1914). For this special issue of LIT we are soliciting essays concerning experiences of and with tourism over the course of the long nineteenth century, as those experiences are documented, codified, and complicated in literatures devoted to travel.

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“Performing the (Neo-)Victorian”

Deadline: July 15, 2015

CFP Link

Neo-Victorian Studies, Spring 2016 Special Issue

This special issue will explore the ways in which modern cultures have re-worked the Victorian past through performance. As Marvin Carlson has famously suggested, theatre is a haunted practice, summoning up ghosts of past productions, styles and performances, which are often inherited from the Victorian age. Present-day live representations of the Victorians inevitably mix elements of the ‘old theatre’ – nineteenth-century auditoria, costume and spectacle – with ‘new performance’, such as projections, recorded sound, and different configurations of performance space, actor-audience relations, performance styles and scripting or devising practices. This special issue seeks to examine such haunted interactions between old and new performance both in the theatre and beyond the stage. The guest editors invite contributions from those working across a range of arts disciplines, both scholars and practitioners, who can elaborate and analyse the ways in which the Victorians have been performed in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. While fiction and film have enjoyed scholarly attention in the field of neo-Victorian Studies drama, theatrical entertainments, music, dance, visual and audio cultures are all areas which have been relatively neglected. This special issue seeks to extend the existing neo-Victorian canon and firmly place performance as a practice heavily invested in the afterlives of Victorian culture.

Please address enquiries and expressions of interest to the guest editors Beth Palmer at b.palmer@surrey.ac.uk and Benjamin Poore at benjamin.poore@york.ac.uk. Completed articles and/or creative pieces, along with a short biographical note, will be due by July 15, 2015 and should be sent via email to both guest editors, with a copy to neovictorianstudies@swansea.ac.uk. Please consult the NVS website (‘Submission Guidelines’) for further guidance

Journeys to Authority: Travel Writing and the Rise of the Woman of the Letters

Deadline: May 1, 2015

Special Issue of Women’s Writing

CFP Link

The late eighteenth century saw the emergence of the woman travel writer. Prior to this, travel writing was a prestigious and important ‘knowledge genre’ from which women were largely excluded (although of course many women produced private, unpublished accounts of travels in letters and journals). In the wake, however, of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’s acclaimed Turkish Embassy Letters (1763), women began to publish travel accounts in ever-increasing numbers. By the 1840s, indeed, the travelogue had arguably become a staple form for a new generation of ‘women of letters’ such as Harriet Martineau and Anna Jameson, and women continued to publish extensively in the genre throughout the Victorian period.

This was a development welcomed by some contemporaries, decried by others. Chauvinist commentators saw women’s increasing incursion into this intellectually significant genre as devaluing the form. Where travel writing had traditionally offered useful knowledge and substantive contributions to contemporary debate across a range of disciplines, the female-authored travelogue, it was alleged, necessarily took the genre in a more lightweight, literary direction, offering only trivial or dilettante observations. Modern scholarship has often unwittingly endorsed this attitude, assuming that women in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were excluded from contemporary networks of scholarship and knowledge production, and accordingly identifying many female-authored travelogues as principally exercises in the sentimental and picturesque. Continue reading

“Waterloo and Its Afterlife in the Nineteenth-Century Periodical and Newspaper Press”

Abstract Deadline: November 30, 2014

Article Deadline: February 20, 2014 (upon acceptance of abstract)

Special Issue of Victorian Periodicals Review (Winter 2015)

CFP from VICTORIA

In anticipation of the 2015 Research Society for Victorian Periodicals (RSVP) annual conference hosted by the University of Ghent, Belgium, Victorian Periodicals Review invites submissions for a special issue commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. Napoleon’s final defeat was of course a watershed event in the history of Europe, and the political and cultural impact of the battle would remain fresh for decades to come. Wellington, for instance, lived well into the Victorian period, and his massive state funeral in 1852—the same year that saw the nephew of his adversary at Waterloo crowned emperor of France—was a major cultural and historical event in its own right. These and other events shaped by the historical legacy of Waterloo inspired intense coverage and debate in the periodical press of the time, and for this special issue, we invite submissions from a variety of perspectives and from across disciplines which re-examine this legacy and shed light on the conventions of periodical and newspaper journalism of the period.  Continue reading

Special Edition of “Symbiosis: A Journal of Transatlantic Literary and Cultural Relations”

Deadline for submissions: December 31, 2014

CFP from VICTORIA listserv

Special edition of Symbiosis: A Journal of Transatlantic Literary and Cultural Relations on the ‘Irish Transatlantic: Act of Union (1800) to the Present Day’

The Autumn 2015 issue of Symbiosis: A Journal of Transatlantic Literary and Cultural Relations will take as its focus the literary and cultural exchange between Ireland and the Americas from the Act of Union (1800) to the present day. We seek to provide a window onto the expansive and multifarious nature of Irish transatlantic studies, publishing a range of articles which illustrate the depth and breadth of contemporary scholarship in this area. Despite the unquestionable historical, material and political connections between these two geographical locations, the Irish dimension to transatlantic studies is often overlooked. Burgeoning interest in transatlantic studies has led to the publication of innovative book series on the topic; while this is an exciting move in scholarship, the number of texts that display sustained engagement with Irish transatlantic concerns is surprisingly low. Similarly, although the historiography of the Irish diaspora is a rich field, transatlantic Irish literary and cultural studies is an uneven area of inquiry; notably, while the Famine years have received plentiful commentary, there is a dearth of scholarship considering the decades preceding this.

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“Elizabeth Gaskell and Victorian Short Fiction,” Special Issue

Deadline: March 1, 2015

2015 Special Issue of Gaskell Journal

Journal Website

In the last couple of decades, critical reappraisals of Gaskell’s shorter fiction have been at the heart of a wider burgeoning interest in the Victorian short story. Discussions of Gaskell have shown her use of the form for radical explorations of gender, power relations, religion, history and the emotions, as well as revealing striking generic differences from her better-known longer works. The 2015 edition of the Gaskell Journal invites papers which extend this consideration of Gaskell as a writer of short fiction, including her short stories and novellas. The editors invite innovative readings of these works, and comparative studies of Gaskell’s short fiction alongside that of her literary peers.

The special number will be co-edited by Dr Rebecca Styler (Gaskell Journal Editor) and Dr Elizabeth Ludlow (Guest Editor) who have both published on Gaskell’s short fiction. Articles are due by  March 1, 2015 to rstyler@lincoln.ac.uk (please follow the stylesheet to be found in the ‘Authors’ section of journal website, gaskelljournal.co.uk). Please direct any queries or expressions of interest to rstyler@lincoln.ac.uk .

Reminder: “Longevity Networks” Special Issue of Victoriographies

Deadline: June 30, 2014

Publication: Fall 2015

CFP Link

Journal Website

Essays are sought for a special number of Victoriographies inspired by the concept of textual longevity. There is a great deal of energy in media studies, new materialism, and print culture around questions of textual longevity. The editors understand longevity to mean the iterability of text, broadly conceived: reprinting, versions, editions, revisions, translation, interpretation, appropriation, the readymade, intermediality, homage, modernization, spoof, and parody.

Read more on the original posting.