MLA 2017

This post will consolidate MLA 2017 postings of panels of interest to those of us in the research group.

Dates: January 5-8, 2017

Location: Philadelphia

See below for listings:

18th Century British

Byron Society of America

  • “Byron and Consumption”: Byron’s relationship to “being consumed” and to consumption in its various forms. Topics may include the poet’s attitudes toward ingestion; capitalism and commodification; illness and obsession. Abstract, 250 words. to Ghislaine McDayter (mcdayter@bucknell.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

Goethe Society of North America

  • “Refugees, Migrants, and Exiles in the Age of Goethe”: This panel examines figurations, metaphors, and constellations of displacement, engaging with questions of belonging, home, and escape, broadly construed. 1-page abstract to Birgit Tautz (btautz@bowdoin.edu) and Karin Schutjer (kschutjer@ou.edu).–Deadline: March 1, 2016
  • “What Goethe Heard: Hearing and Listening in the Long Eighteenth Century”: Papers exploring representations and conceptions of sound, hearing, and listening in German literature of the long eighteenth century. 300 words abstracts to Mary Dupree (mhd33@georgetown.edu) and Birgit Tautz (btautz@bowdoin.edu).–Deadline: March 1, 2016

John Clare Society of North America

  • “John Clare: The One and The Many”: Scholarship on any aspect of singularity, multiplicity, unity, disorder, and/or the myriad meanings, images or forms in Clare’s life and work. Abstract and brief bio to Erica McAlpine (erica.mcalpine@keble.ox.ac.uk).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

Keats-Shelley Association of America

  • “Romantics 200 Project: 2017 Reads 1817”: Retrospective on literary culture in 1817; writings, debates, reputations; Shelleys, Keats, Byron, Austen, Hemans, Scott, Coleridge, Hazlitt, etc. Fuller description at k-saa.org. Detailed proposals or drafts to Susan Wolfson (wolfson@princeton.edu) and William Galperin–Deadline: March 10, 2016

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism

  • “Interrelations of Narrative and Lyric in Romantic Literature”: This panel addresses the interaction between narrative and lyric in Romantic genres, e.g. event sequences within lyrics; lyric passages within narratives. Abstracts (250-300 words) to David Allen Collings (dcolling@bowdoin.edu) and Jan Alber (janalber@aias.au.dk). Deadline: February 15, 2016

Wordworth-Coleridge Association

  • “Migration and Domesticity in British Romanticism”: Proposals should examine representations of migration and domesticity in British Romantic literature and literary biography. Topics may include immigration, emigration, borders, homelands, homelessness, domestic life. Abstracts to James C. McKusick (mckusickj@umkc.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

CLCS Romantic and 19th-Century

  • “Romanticism and the Right to Violence”: By what means–economic, political, linguistic–is the right to exercise violence affirmed or contested (violently/nonviolently) within Romanticism? Comparative approaches are especially welcome. 300-word abstracts to Jan Mieszkowski (mieszkow@reed.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

LLC English Romantic

  • “Romanticism Unbound”: Where are the boundaries of Romanticism? Can “romanticism” help us grasp: immigration, refugees, population flows; travelling theory and/or travelling bodies; vulnerability, precariousness, internal displacement, worldliness? abstracts; 300 words to Colin Jager (colin.jager@rutgers.edu).–Deadline: March 10, 2016
  • “Biographia Literaria at 200”: Reading in, with, through, and against Coleridge. Biographia Literaria as text, performance, doctrine; legacies and antecedents. 500-word abstracts or 15-minute papers to Margaret E. Russett (russett@usc.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

CLCS 18th-Century

  • “18th-Century New Media: Itineraries of Word & Image”: Papers on the interaction of text and illustration with attention to cross-cultural translation during the long 18th century. 200-300 word abstracts; 1-page CV to Chi-ming Yang (cmyang@english.upenn.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

“Green Cities in 18th and 19th Century Literatures”: How do 18th and 19th urban literatures negotiate the boundaries between rural and urban, nature and culture? 250-word abstracts to Kate Scarth (kscarth@dal.ca).–Deadline: March 15, 2016


19th Century American

Edith Wharton Society

  • “Edith Wharton’s Summer”: The Edith Wharton Society invites papers addressing Wharton’s novel Summer. Full CFP on the Edith Wharton Society Web site. 250-word abstracts and brief bio. 250-word abstracts & brief bios to Paul Ohler (paul.ohler@kpu.ca.).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

Emily Dickinson International Society

  • Dickinson in the Anthropocene”: How does the idea of the Anthropocene change our understanding of Emily Dickinson? Presentations on ecopoetics, vitalism, animal studies, periodization, and other topics welcome. Abstract, cv to Cody Marrs (cmarrs@uga.edu).–Deadline: March 10, 2016
  • “The Spatial Turn in Dickinson and Her Contemporaries”: Presentations on memory, artifact, and experience; reconstructing lost landscapes or mindscapes; immersive environments; ambiguity and contingency in representations of the past welcome. Abstract, cv to Marta L. Werner (wernerm@dyc.edu).–March 10, 2016

Ernest Hemingway Foundation and Society

Mark Twain Circle of America

  • “The Politics of Mark Twain’s America”: Proposals are invited examining any aspect of Clemens’ work in relation to the ideologies, social movements, and class/race/gender tensions of his era. 1 page abstract to Kerry Driscoll (kdriscoll@usj.edu).–Deadline: March 10, 2016

Melville Society

  • “Melville and Black Lives Matter”: How does Melville’s art speak to racial crises as well as mediate philosophical dilemmas, political history, class conflict etc.? 250 word abstract; short bio to Christopher Freeburg (ccfreeburg@gmail.com).–Deadline: March 15, 2016
  • “Melville’s Taxonomies”: How do Melville’s works from Mardi on problematize categorial divides to confuse living/non-living, persons/things, prophetic/rational? Natural histories, biological politics, extinction, vegetal and animal life. CV and 250 word abstract to Branka Arsic (ba2406@columbia.edu).–Deadline: March 1, 2016

Nathaniel Hawthorne Society

  • “Ecologies of Hawthorne”: Consider representations of space and place, land and landscape, the “natural” and “unnatural,” environmental “transgressions,” “deviance” in “nature,” and the relationship between humans and their environment. Send 250-word abstracts to Charles Baraw (barawc1@southernct.edu) and Jason Courtmanche (jason.courtmanche@uconn.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

Poe Studies Association

  • “Poe and Antebellum Writers”: Papers that contrast Poe with another antebellum writer, famous or forgotten. Possibilities abound: Dickinson, Longfellow, Whitman, Chivers, Benjamin, Child, Lippard, Sprague, Hawthorne, etc. 250 word abstract and cv to Amy Armiento (abranam@frostburg.edu).–Deadline: March 6, 2016

Society for the Study of Southern Literature

  • “The Fantastic South”: A roundtable of 5-7 minute presentations that feature work engaging with the U.S. South in science fiction, fantasy, and all forms of speculative fiction. 250-word abstracts to Katharine A. Burnett (kburnett@fisk.edu) and Monica Miller (monica.miller@lmc.gatech.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016
  • “Straddling the Dividing Line: Reconsidering the Civil War”: A roundtable of 5-7 minute presentations that consider new interdisciplinary readings of the Civil War, including contemporary and nineteenth-century representations. 250-word abstracts to Katharine A. Burnett (kburnett@fisk.edu) and Jennifer Lightweis-Goff (jlightwe@tulane.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

LLC 19th Century American

  • “The Carceral State”: How did 19th-century forms of imprisonment from impressment to debt peonage, among others, construct the U.S. as a carceral state, then as well as now? 250-word proposal to Ivy Wilson (i-wilson@northwestern.edu).–Deadline: March 23, 2016
  • “Defunct Sexualities”: What forgotten or abandoned sexual/gender identities or practices has queer scholarship brought into view, and how can this research enliven our understanding of sexuality past and present? 250-word abstracts to Dana Luciano (dl234@georgetown.edu). —Deadline: March 22, 2016

LLC Late-19th and Early-20th-Century American

  • “Prelude to the ‘American Century'”: How does post-1865 writing offer a prelude to and encourage new perspectives on militarization, empire, security, and other developments of the late-twentieth-century? abstracts to Russ Castronovo (rcastronovo@wisc.edu). —Deadline: March 11, 2016
  • “Queer Collectivity at the Fin de Siècle”: Sewing circles, quilting bees, tea time, hobos, unionizers, strikes, writers’ groups, intimate group friendships: small, minor, large, spontaneous, organized. 250 word abstracts to Dana Seitler (d.seitler@utoronto.ca). —Deadline: March 11, 2016

“Beyond Queer Masculinity in C19 American Studies”: What underserved archives of our queer American genealogy lie beyond the C19 gay male archive? How should we attend to them now? 250-word abstracts by 15 March 2016; Timothy Griffiths (tgriffiths@gradcenter.cuny.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

“Dickinson’s Punctuation: What was her purpose?”: What do the punctuation features in Emily’s manuscripts represent, mean, or do? For whom? Is there a coherent system? One-page abstracts which get to the point. Albert E. Krahn (krahn@punctuation.org).–Deadline: March 1, 2016

“Nineteenth-Century American Poetry: Form and Politics”: How does form (genre, poetics, style) register social and political change? In what ways does form mediate, for example, economy, technology, war, abolitionism, empire? Abstract, bio to Magdalena Zapedowska (mzapedowskae@english.umass.edu).–Deadline: February 15, 2016

“Queer(ing) Kinship in the Nineteenth Century”: How do Romantic and Victorian writers imagine alternative social networks and queer affective relations? 300-word abstract plus CV to Talia Vestri Croan (tmvcroan@bu.edu) and Shannon Draucker (sdraucke@bu.edu).–Deadline: March 20, 2016

“Green Cities in 18th and 19th Century Literatures”: How do 18th and 19th urban literatures negotiate the boundaries between rural and urban, nature and culture? 250-word abstracts to Kate Scarth (kscarth@dal.ca).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

“Death, Violence, and Religion in Nineteenth Century American Fiction”: [from C19 listserv] We invite essays focusing on representations of death and/or violence in U.S. religiously inflected fictions of the nineteenth century. Essays might examine consider, for example:

– the ways authors associated with religious traditions have embraced or rejected imagery commonly associated with death and/or violence
– the kinds of spaces in which violence and/or death are figured
– death and/or violence as metaphors for religious experience
– the rhetorical strategies deployed to use religion as a justification for sectional, racial, and territorial violence
– how struggles for political representation are waged via religious representations, and the connotations that accompany particular religious traditions.

Given that religious connotations are subject to revision, this panel also welcomes papers that evaluate how representations change over the long-nineteenth century, and how violence committed by or against particular sects is re-coded in works of fiction. Please send 250-word abstracts to Will Fenton at fenton@fordham.edu.–Deadline: March 15, 2016

“Weathering the 19th-Century Novel”: Interdisciplinary explorations of weather and climate in the 19th-century novel (especially beyond Romanticism): realism/naturalism, weather and modernity, ecology, urban/rural, technology and the novel. 250-word abstracts to Jessica Tanner (jltanner@email.unc.edu). —Deadline: March 15, 2016


19th Century British

Dickens Society

  • “Dickens and Family?”: A novelist of ‘hearth and home,’ Dickens authored more broken homes than harmonious ones, in life and fiction. Please send 250-word proposals to Lillian Nayder (lnayder@bates.edu) and Natalie McKnight (njmck@bu.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

Lyrica Society for Word-Music Relations

  • “The Musical Side of George Bernard Shaw”: Explore Shaw’s musical aspects–his musical criticism, the use of music in his plays, etc. Submit 200 word proposals on Shaw and music to Jeff Dailey (drjsdailey@aol.com).–Deadline: March 11, 2016

William Morris Society

  • “Craft and Design in Literary Study: The Legacy of William Morris”: We seek explorations of craft/design histories and theories re: Morris as writer and thinker. 1-2 page abstract and c.v. (2-page maximum) to Linda Kay Hughes (l.hughes@tcu.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016
  • “Beautiful and Useful: The Lasting Legacy of William Morris and the Art of the Book”:  The session seeks papers on Morris, his contemporaries, and/or his transnational successors (e.g., the Anglo-American Arts and Crafts Movement, Jugendstil or Art Nouveau book design, and current fine arts presses). The coordinators are particularly interested in how concepts embodied in Morris’s design of the book and the influence of manuscript culture have been translated across literary and artistic periods. Considerations of paper, inks, bindings, and type fonts are also welcome. Send 1-2 page abstracts and a c.v. (2-page max.) demaria@vassar.edu and l.hughes@tcu.edu.–Deadline: March 15, 2016

LLC Victorian and Early-20th Century English

  • “Medieval and Victorian Temporalities”: How do medieval and Victorian literature figure temporal scale? What is, or should be, the temporal scale of critical practice in these fields? Roundtable discussion. Abstract, cv to Catherine Sanok (sanok@umich.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016
  • “Modernist Terror, 1890-1930”: Modalities of terror and violence: individual/collective; bodily/mental; domestic/imperial. CV and 300-word abstract to Elizabeth Outka (eoutka@richmond.edu).–Deadline: March 1, 2016

“Human-Animal Boundaries in 19th-century British Literature”: Papers may consider definitions of the human in relation to animality; concepts of species; human-animal relations (affective, violent, etc.); and/or the nonhuman. 250-word abstract and CV by 11 March 2016; Kaitlin Mondello (kmondello@gradcenter.cuny.edu).–Deadline: March 11, 2016

“Queer(ing) Kinship in the Nineteenth Century”: How do Romantic and Victorian writers imagine alternative social networks and queer affective relations? 300-word abstract plus CV to Talia Vestri Croan (tmvcroan@bu.edu) and Shannon Draucker (sdraucke@bu.edu).–Deadline: March 20, 2016

“Novel Technologies: Victorian (Old/New) Media”: Seeking papers on Victorian old/new media: telegraph, telephone, pre-cinematic screen technologies, microscopes, publishing technologies, the novel as a technology, etc. 300-word abstracts and 1-page CV to Jessica Kuskey (jkuskey@oberlin.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

“Higher Ed in Crisis: What Can the Victorians Teach Us?”: Victorianists have become all too familiar with a dispiriting refrain: These are hard times for higher education; hard times demand hard decisions; hard decisions have to be hardest on the humanities. The rhetoric of liberal education for the people, one of the most influential and enduring of Victorian legacies, is now most relevant to us not because scholars continue to problematize it but because administrators increasingly dismiss it as a marketing albatross.  As the AAC&U fights a valiant yet uphill battle to preserve the best parts of that legacy, the term “liberal education” is being deleted around the country, and applying the term “Victorian” to views on education has become more damning than applying the same term to sexual attitudes.  But what if the Victorians can help us overcome our current “crisis” in higher education?  What can they teach us about our 21st-century problems?  This panel seeks to answer these questions from a variety of perspectives. Panelists from all disciplines are encouraged to submit a 300-word abstract and short bio to thieleds@mountunion.eduDeadline: March 11, 2015 (From VICTORIA Listserv)

“Victorian Party Politics”: This session explores the literary and historical significance of Victorian dinners and parties and the cultural narratives they (re)produce. 300-word abstracts to Andrew Forrester (aforrester@smu.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

“Green Cities in 18th and 19th Century Literatures”: How do 18th and 19th urban literatures negotiate the boundaries between rural and urban, nature and culture? 250-word abstracts to Kate Scarth (kscarth@dal.ca).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

“Friendship in Victorian and British fin-de-siecle Fictions”: This panel explores friendship in Victorian, and British fin-de-siecle’, fictions. Abstracts of 300-500 words and a one-page CV to Elizabeth Macaluso (emacalu1@binghamton.edu). —Deadline: March 15, 2016

“Weathering the 19th-Century Novel”: Interdisciplinary explorations of weather and climate in the 19th-century novel (especially beyond Romanticism): realism/naturalism, weather and modernity, ecology, urban/rural, technology and the novel. 250-word abstracts to Jessica Tanner (jltanner@email.unc.edu). —Deadline: March 15, 2016


20th Century American

William Faulkner Society

  • “Faulkner and World Literature”: William Faulkner in the context of world literature. Nationalism, global modernism, (de)colonization, economics, canon formation, pedagogy; comparative and theoretical approaches. 250-word abstract and brief bio to Ted Atkinson (wfsociety@gmail.com).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

LLC Late-19th-and Early-20th Century American

  • “Prelude to the ‘American Century'”: How does post-1865 writing offer a prelude to and encourage new perspectives on militarization, empire, security, and other developments of the late-twentieth-century? abstracts to Russ Castronovo (rcastronovo@wisc.edu).–Deadline: March 11, 2016
  • “Queer Collectivity at the Fin de Siècle”:Sewing circles, quilting bees, tea time, hobos, unionizers, strikes, writers’ groups, intimate group friendships: small, minor, large, spontaneous, organized. 250 word abstracts to Dana Seitler (d.seitler@utoronto.ca).–Deadline: March 11, 2016

“William James and Literary Studies”: On behalf of the William James Society, we seek abstract proposals for the 2017 MLA Convention that address William James and literary studies, broadly conceived. 150-word abstracts to Justin Rogers-Cooper (jrogers@lagcc.cuny.edu) and Todd Barosky (TBarosky@stmartin.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016


20th Century British

D.H. Lawrence Society of America

  • “Conrad and Lawrence at Sea”: Comparisons of these writers “at sea,” whether as experience, setting, metaphor for uncertainty, symbol, or other. Collaborative session with Joseph Conrad Society. Abstract (250 words) to Joyce Piell Wexler (jwexler@luc.edu)–Deadline: March 1, 2016
  • “Lawrence and the ‘New Modernisms'”: Lawrence was often excluded or vilified by modernist critics. We invite abstracts on how the “New Modernisms” reposition Lawrence’s texts, affecting their meaning or importance. 250-word abstracts to Nancy L. Paxton (nancy.paxton@nau.edu).–Deadline: March 1, 2016

International Virginia Woolf Society

  • “Virginia Woolf Scholars Come to Their Senses”: Two possible approaches: papers addressing sense modalities in Woolf’s writing, OR papers debating “corrective” readings of Woolf that suggest “progress” in Woolf criticism. Abstracts to Pamela L. Caughie (pcaughi@luc.edu).–Deadline: March 21, 2016

Joseph Conrad Society of America

  • “Conrad and Lawrence at Sea”: Comparisons of these writers “at sea,” whether as experience, setting, metaphor for uncertainty, symbol, or other. Collaborative session with Joseph Conrad Society. Abstract (250 words) to Joyce Piell Wexler (jwexler@luc.edu)–Deadline: March 1, 2016
  • “Conrad and Mimetic Theories”: How does Conrad help us rethink imitation? Presentations on mimicry, contagion, identification, mimetic desire, simulation, mirror neurons welcome. CV and abstract to Nidesh Lawtoo <nlawtoo1@jhu.edu>. Abstract (250 words); Nidesh Lawtoo (nlawtoo1@jhu.edu) and Paul Armstrong (paul_armstrong@brown.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016
  • “Conrad’s Animals”: What roles do animals play in Conrad? How does Conrad theorize the animal? How does Conrad “think with” animals? Abstracts (250 words) to Stephen Ross <saross@uvic.ca>; Stephen Ross (saross@uvic.ca) and Paul Armstrong (paul_armstrong@brown.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

Wallace Stevens Society


American & British Non-Specific Time Period Special Sessions

LLC Southern United States

  • “Queer Southern Imaginaries”: How do erotic, sexual, and gender imaginaries shape regional and national constructions of “the South”? Queer treatments of sexuality, gender, race, religion, fetishism, futurism, historicism. 250-word abstract and CV to Michael Bibler (mbibler@lsu.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016
  • “The Revolution(ary) South”: The South and revolutionary moments. How might focusing on the South complicate concepts of “revolution”? How might a broader definition of “revolution” complicate the South? 250-word abstract and CV to Gina Caison (gcaison@gsu.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

“Character in the Realist Novel”: This panel explores how fictional characters help us think relationships between emotion and cognition, art and ethics, or individuality and sociability. 250-300 word abstracts to Matthew Flaherty (mflaher7@jhu.edu).–Deadline: March 14, 2016

“The Forms of American Religion”: What forms does U.S. religion take? Seeking papers on the influence of literary, cultural, political forms on U.S. theologies and practices. 150-200 word abstracts to Wilson Brissett (wilson.brissett@usafa.edu).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

“Anti-Marriage Plots”: This panel queries the dominance of the marriage plot in the novel. What are its counter-narratives or queer displacements in eighteenth century fiction? 250-word abstracts and CV to Kathleen Lubey (kathleen.lubey@gmail.com).–Deadline: March 15, 2016

“The Historical Novel as Generic Hybrid”: This panel welcomes reassessment of the historical novel from literary scholars working in a wide range of historical periods and geographic regions. While the classic historical novel is often thought of as a literary genre in its own right, many historical narratives are actually generic hybrids comprised of other genres. What is the significance of these generic elements? Does the historical novel contain certain essential features or is the term merely a placeholder for fictions about the past? How has its definition changed over time, and how might we wish to alter it today? Please submit a proposal of approximately 300 words and one-page CV to bdodell2@illinois.edu.–Deadline: March, 15, 2016

“Women and American Naturalism”: Papers examining perspectives on and presentations of women, womanhood, and related questions of gender and performance in works of American naturalism, broadly conceived. 250 word abstract to Marc Dziak (dziakm@sanjuancollege.edu). —Deadline: March 14, 2016

“American Women Writers and Race: Exploring Boundaries”: How have American women written about race and boundaries/barriers/borders? To what ends? Identity, the concept of freedom, race and affect theory. 250-word abstracts and bios to Maggie A. Rehm (m.a.rehm@gmail.com).  —Deadline: March 15, 2016

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