“A Time of Judgement” : The Operation and Representation of Judgement in Nineteenth-Century Cultures (International)

Deadline: November 30, 2015

Dates: June 23-24, 2016

Location: Plymouth University, UK

CFP Link

This international, interdisciplinary conference seeks to examine the role of “judgement” in the nineteenth century, in both the Anglophone and European cultures. As a theme, related to but distinct from notions of justice, judgement has not attracted much attention from humanities scholars in contrast to the interest expressed in philosophy and psychology.

The nineteenth century saw judgement operating and developing in a multiplicity of ways: with national and international architectural and art competitions, and awards for design at universal exhibitions, and the proliferation of a literary market that saw judgement (understood as discrimination and evaluation) exercised in popular and learned reviews. Scientific controversies also involved judgements.

The legal aspect of judgment is an obvious theme and can be explored from both legal history and literary perspectives, as well as through visual culture. The conference is also, however, interested in how non-legal acts of judgement were depicted, for example in Pre-Raphaelite and other artistic representations of the “judgement of Paris,” or Christian works such as Thomas Martin’s “Last Judgement.”

Please send a 300 word abstract by November 30, 2015, with a brief biography, to one of the conference co-ordinators:

annika.bautz@plymouth.ac.uk

james.r.gregory@plymouth.ac.uk

daniel.grey@plymouth.ac.uk

kim.stevenson@plymouth.ac.uk

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