MLA 2016

This post will consolidate MLA 2016 postings of panels of interest to those of us in the research group.

See below for listings:

18th Century British

  • “Affect Studies and British Romanticism”Deadline: March 1, 2015
    • Papers on how affect studies has redefined our understanding of the emotions in British Romantic literature. 300-word abstract and brief bio (one paragraph) by 1 March 2015; Seth Reno (sreno@aum.edu).
  • Byron Society of America: “Byron and America”Deadline: March 23, 2015
    • New scholarship related to Byron’s American reception and his own views of America and American culture. 250 word abstract and brief bio by 23 March 2015; Noah Comet (comet@usna.edu).
  • Goethe Society of North America
    • “Cognitive Science in/and the Goethezeit”Deadline: March 1, 2015
      • The intersection of cognitive science and cultural practices: how Germanliterary/philosophical texts circa 1800 depict cognition and how contemporary cognitive science illuminates those texts. 1-page abstracts by 1 March 2015; Charlotte Lee (cll38@cam.ac.uk) and John Smith (jhsmith@uci.edu).
    • “Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Narratologist?”Deadline: March 1, 2015
      • What can Goethe and narrative theory do for each other? How can narrative theory illuminate Goethe’s novelistic practice? How can his practice alter narrative theory? 1-page abstracts by 1 March 2015; Karin Schutjer (kschutjer@ou.edu) and Erin McGlothlin (mcglothlin@wustl.edu).
  • Keats-Shelley Association of America: “The Futures of Shelley’s Triumph”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • What shadows of futurity does Percy Shelley’s unfinished final poem cast upon our present? New perspectives on “The Triumph of Life” within/beyond the Anthropocene. 250 word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Joel Faflak (jfaflak@uwo.ca).
  • LLC English Romantic: “Romantic Sovereignty”Deadline: March 2, 2015
    • old v. new models; sacred v. secular; grounded/ungrounded political authority; kings/beasts; rules and exceptions; rights and institutions. 200-word abstracts by 2 March 2015; Mark Canuel (mcanuel@uic.edu).
  • LLC Late-18th-Century English:
    • “The British Pharmacopoeia”–Deadline: March 5, 2015

      • Papers on Scottish physicians/rhetoricians–Enlightenment redefinitions of British bodies/bodies politic. Collaborative session between Late 18th-Century English Literature and Scottish Literature forums. 250-word abstracts by 5 March 2015; Juliet Shields (js37@u.washington.edu) and Rivka Swenson (rswenson@vcu.edu).
    • “The Intermedial Eighteenth Century”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • Topics might include remediation or interactions between page/stage; image/text/sound; orality/literacy; manuscript/print. 300-word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Jonathan Sachs (jonathan.sachs@concordia.ca).
    • “Uselessness”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • Must Enlightenment be synonymous with instrumentality? Topics might include the decorative, the insignificant, the ‘purely’ aesthetic, the irrelevant, the non-propositional, the anti-georgic, boredom. 300 word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Jayne Elizabeth Lewis (jelewis@uci.edu).
  • North American Society for the Study of Romanticism:
  • “The Interval in Romanticism”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • The space between integers; the space-time of pause, interruption, irritation, irruption. The interval as rhythmic or dissonance; disruption leading to solution or dissolution. 250 word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Elizabeth Fay (elizabeth.fay@umb.edu).
    • “Romantic Ecocriticism: Thinking Forward”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • Papers taking Romantic ecocriticism forward. Suggestions: aesthetics, forms of knowledge, new developments in theory. NASSR-sponsored special session. 350-word proposals by 15 March 2015; Susan Oliver (soliver@essex.ac.uk).
    • “Romantic Sovereignty”–Deadline: March 2, 2015
      • Old vs. new models; sacred vs. secular; grounded/ungrounded political authority; kings/beasts; rules and exceptions; rights and institutions. Collaborative session. 200-word abstracts by 2 March 2015; Mark Canuel (mcanuel@uic.edu).
  • “Performing Romanticism(s)”Deadline: March 10, 2015
    • Papers addressing how literary scholars can use performance–the stage, lectern, classroom, and other non-traditional scholarly practices–to reconsider issues pertaining to Romantic-era drama, poetry, and prose. 250-word abstracts and brief bio by 10 March 2015; Omar F. Miranda (ofm203@nyu.edu) and Randall Sessler (ras559@nyu.edu).
  • “The Romantic Public”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • Forms, definitions, spheres, resistances, effects, legacies of “the public” – past, present, and future – as imagined or provoked by Romantic literature. 250-word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Matthew Borushko (mborushko@stonehill.edu).
  • “Sublime Bodies c. 1730-1830”–Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • How did C18 and C19 authors use the discourse of the sublime to understand physicality, embodiment, or materiality? Send abstract (250-300 words) and abbreviated c.v. by 15 March 2015; Michele Speitz (michele.speitz@furman.edu) and Terry F. Robinson (terry.robinson@utoronto.ca).
  • Wordsworth-Coleridge Association: “Romantic Religion”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • Beliefs, practices, and representations of religion in the British Romantic period. Topics may include British, American and European texts and sermons, faith and practice, dissent, mysticism, and natural theology. Abstracts by 15 March 2015; James C. McKusick (mckusickj@umkc.edu).

19th Century American

  • LLC Early American: “Reexamining New World Encounters: where do we go from here?”–Deadline: March 13, 2015
    • A panel introducing new theoretical perspectives, untapped archives, and cross-disciplinary methodologies in the study of cross-cultural encounter in the early Americas. by 13 March 2015; Ralph Bauer (bauerr@umd.edu) and Matt Cohen (matt.cohen@utexas.edu).
  • Edith Wharton Society: “Edith Wharton and the Fin de Siecle”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • Wharton’s engagements with decadence, aestheticism, naturalism, the femme fatale, degeneration, vampirism, hysteria, art nouveau, other fin-de-siècle writers, and so on. 250-word abstracts and brief bio by 15 March 2015; Emily Orlando (eorlando@fairfield.edu).
  • Emily Dickinson International Society
    • “Lyrical Ecologies”Deadline: March 1, 2015

      • Presentations engaging the circulation of Dickinson’s writings through human communities, or of non-human entities through her work. Reflections on textual and material ecologies, the posthuman, etc. 300-words abstracts, short cvs by 1 March 2015; Eliza Richards (eliza_richards@unc.edu) and Marta Werner (wernerm@dyc.edu).
    • “Melville, Dickinson, and 19thc Experimentalism”Deadline: March 1, 2015
      • Melville/Dickinson as point of departure for discussion of “experimentalism,” broadly defined, in 19C poetry and the cultural field: dispersed authorial sovereignty, animality/the post human, etc. cv&300w proposal by 1 March 2015; Eliza Richards (ecr@email.unc.edu) and Peter Riley (P.Riley@exeter.ac.uk).
  • Henry James Society
    • “James and Retrospection”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • Commemorating the anniversary of James’s death, papers about retrospection in James’s work, in narratives about James, and about the rhetorical foundations and consequences of retrospection in James studies. Papers by 15 March 2015; Karen Scherzinger (kscherzinger@uj.ac.za).
    • James, Mothers, and the Maternal”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • Absent and present mothers in James’s fiction, James’s mother (and other maternal figures in his family), James and theories about the maternal and the maternal body. Papers by 15 March 2015; Karen Scherzinger (kscherzinger@uj.ac.za).
  • LLC Late-19th-and Early-20th-Century American: “Conservatives and Conservatism”–Deadline: March 15, 2013
    • Conservatives and Conservatism: What is the relationship between “conservative” ideology and literary production? Arranged by Division on Late-19th- and Early-20th-Century American Literature. Abstracts by March 15 to rcastronovo@wisc.edu. abstracts by 15 February 2015; Russ Castronovo (rcastronovo@wisc.edu).
  • Mark Twain Circle of America: “Re-Presenting Twain”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • Papers are invited examining interpretations of Twain’s identity and legacy both in his own work (particularly his newly-published Autobiography) and more broadly in contemporary popular culture. 1 page abstract by 15 March 2015; Kerry Driscoll (kerryannedriscoll@gmail.com).
  • Melville Society
    • “Melville, Dickinson, and 19thc Experimentalism”Deadline: March 1, 2015
      • Melville/Dickinson as point of departure for discussion of “experimentalism,” broadly defined, in 19C poetry and the cultural field: dispersed authorial sovereignty, animality/the post human, etc. cv&300w proposal by 1 March 2015; Eliza Richards (ecr@email.unc.edu) and Peter Riley (P.Riley@exeter.ac.uk).
    • “Melville’s Late Fiction, or Radical Inhabitation”Deadline: February 15, 2015
      • How do Melville’s late fictions, Moby-Dick & after, recast natural histories of the Americas, remake the terrain of the gothic and redefine the supernatural? abstract, cv by 15 February 2015; Colin Dayan (colin.dayan@Vanderbilt.Edu).
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne Society
    • “Hawthorne and Milton”Deadline: March 1, 2015
      • Connections sought include images of nation; uses of bible and classical mythology; representations of gender and sexuality; race and racism; aesthetic theory; early and later careers. 250 word abstracts by 1 March 2015; David Greven (dgreven@mailbox.sc.edu) and James Hewitson (jhewitso@utk.edu).
    • “Posthumous Hawthorne”Deadline: March 10, 2015
      • Topics include (dis)continuity with autobiographical and fictional works; the authorial integrity of Notebooks, Elixir of Life and American Claimant manuscripts; and the interventions of editors and heirs. 250 word abstracts. by 10 March 2015; Patricia Valenti (patricia.valenti@uncp.edu) and Ivonne Garcia (garciai@kenyon.edu).
  • Ernest Hemingway Foundation and Society: “Hemingway and the American West”Deadline: March 10, 2015
    • This panel invites papers that contrast the writing and life of Ernest Hemingway with aspects of the American West. 250 word abstracts and brief CV by 10 March 2015; Sara A. Kosiba (skosiba@troy.edu).
  • Poe Studies Association: “Poe Biography and Biographical Approaches to Poe”Deadline: March 6, 2015
    • This session will focus on the challenges of writing about Poe’s life and of interpreting Poe’s work through his life. 250-word abstracts and cv by 6 March 2015; Paul Lewis (paul.lewis@bc.edu).
  • “Victorian Sensation and ‘Locomotive’ Women”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • Recover female counterpart of the “locomotive man” (Nead) in Sensation fiction (1860s); relationship between crime and female urbanism; mobile-women; street-walking; female-wandering; nocturnal-perambulations; shopping excursions; international travel. 300w/abstract by 15 March 2015; Megha Anwer (manwer@purdue.edu).

19th Century British

  • John Clare Society of North America: “After John Clare”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • Scholarship on any aspect of Clare’s influence on 19th, 20th, or 21st century poets and/or his poetry’s continuing relevance to the field of lyric studies. brief abstract and bio by 15 March 2015; Erica McAlpine (erica.mcalpine@keble.ox.ac.uk).
  • Dickens Society:
    • “Dickens and Disability”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • Rethinking the “grotesques”: melodrama and sentiment, illness and care relations, cognitive and sensory impairments, chronic and traumatic conditions; prostheses and amputations. 300 word-abstract and 1-page CV by 5 March 2015; Talia Schaffer (talia.schaffer@qc.cuny.edu).
    • “The Dickens Jukebox”Deadline: March 5, 2015
      • Examining the use of music in Dickens’s novels: song types and styles, musical characters, role of music in plot formation, theories of music. 300-word abstracts and 1-page CVs by 5 March 2015; Carolyn Williams (carolyn.williams@rutgers.edu).
  • LLC Victorian and Early-20th-Century English
    • “Theory and Victorian Studies”Deadline: March 1, 2015
      • Which theories and theorists, past and present, are most relevant to Victorian studies today? Proposals invited for full-length conference papers or five-minute position papers. 300-word abstracts and CVs by 1 March 2015; Daniel Hack (dhack@umich.edu).
    • “Victorian Intertextualities”Deadline: March 1, 2015
      • Allusion, adaptation, rewriting, plagiarism…. How did Victorian writers use other texts? How did the Victorians categorize, theorize, and value such uses, and how do we? 300-word abstracts and CVs by 1 March 2015; Daniel Hack (dhack@umich.edu).
  • “Victorian Sensation and ‘Locomotive’ Women”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • Recover female counterpart of the “locomotive man” (Nead) in Sensation fiction (1860s); relationship between crime and female urbanism; mobile-women; street-walking; female-wandering; nocturnal-perambulations; shopping excursions; international travel. 300w/abstract by 15 March 2015; Megha Anwer (manwer@purdue.edu).
  • William Morris Society: “Teaching William Morris”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • We seek papers that approach teaching Morris to reach a new generation of scholars and students, especially involving interdisciplinary undergraduate courses, public history, and digital humanities. abstracts and c.v. by 15 March 2015; Linda Kay Hughes (l.hughes@tcu.edu).
  • “William Morris and the Legacy of Socialist Aesthetics”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • We seek papers on socialist aesthetics in the work of Morris, his contemporaries, and successors. Please send abstracts and c.v. to l.hughes@tcu.edu and mnilges@stfx.ca. by 15 March 2015; Linda Kay Hughes (l.hughes@tcu.edu) and Matthias Nilges (mnilges@stfx.ca).

20th Century American

  • LLC 20th-and 21st-Century American: “In Theory: American Literature since 1966”Deadline: March 1, 2015
    • Theory (poststructuralism, critical race, postcolonial, queer, etc.) and theorists in American literature. Theorists as characters; literature as “theory”; theory’s influence. 300 word abstracts by March 1. by 1 March 2015; Mark Goble (mgoble@berkeley.edu).
  • William Faulkner Society
    • “Faulkner and Postcolonialism”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • Current critical approaches and practices in postcolonial studies applied to Faulkner. Diverse theoretical and geographical frameworks and comparative studies are welcome. 250 word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Deborah L. Clarke (deborah.clarke@asu.edu).
    • “Posthuman Possibilities in Faulkner”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • Faulkner’s relation to the multifaceted critical concept of posthumanism. How does Faulkner facilitate or complicate the posthuman as a response to anthropocentrism? 250 word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Deborah L. Clarke (deborah.clarke@asu.edu).
  • Wallace Stevens Society: “Wallace Stevens and Robert Frost”Deadline: March 1, 2015
    • We invite abstracts on Stevens’ and Frost’s work. Possibilities include theories of sound, use of architectural imagery, their mutual disregard, and relations to Emerson. Abstract (250 words) by 1 March 2015; Lisa N. Goldfarb (lg3@nyu.edu) and Natalie Gerber (Natalie.Gerber@fredonia.edu).

20th Century British

  • “The Chronicles of Narnia at 60”Deadline: March 2, 2015
    • Children’s literature scholars response to the Chronicles as a whole on its 60th anniversary. Must consider at least three of the novels. 300 word abstracts by 2 March 2015; Keith Dorwick (kdorwick@louisiana.edu).
  • D.H. Lawrence Society: “Lawrence and ‘Native’ Encounters”Deadline: March 1, 2015
    • We invite papers on D. H. Lawrence’s writings on the American Southwest, Mexico, Australia, race, indigenous cultures, eco-critical readings of place, or related subjects. 250-word abstracts. by 1 March 2015; Joyce Wexler (Jwexler@luc.edu).
  • International Virginia Woolf Society
    • “Textual Woolf”Deadline: March 13, 2015
      • Digital tools, editions, variants, the proliferation of e-texts — all offer a rich array of possibilities for addressing the relative neglect in Woolf studies of textual matters. 250 word abstracts by 13 March 2015; Mark Hussey (mhussey@pace.edu).
    • “Woolf and Disability”Deadline: March 9, 2015
      • This collaborative panel with the Society for Disability Studies explores how disability features thematically and formally in Woolf’s work. Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words. by 9 March 2015; Maren T. Linett (mlinett@purdue.edu).
    • “Woolf, Women, and Politics”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • Considering Woolf’s vexed relationship with feminism, how do we understand the model of political agency Woolf’s female characters portray? Can this inflect contemporary feminist theorizing? 500 word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Erica Gene Delsandro (ericadelsandro@gmail.com).
  • Joseph Conrad Society of America: “Conrad and the Body”Deadline: March 1, 2015
    • Navigating the body in Conrad, including beautiful, grotesque, erotic(ized) bodies; the body as a site where ideology is contested and reinforced. 250-500 word abstracts by 1 March 2015; Alexia Hannis (alexia.hannis@humber.ca).
  • “Modernism and Neurodiversity”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • This session will consider how the emerging discourse of “neurodiversity” provides new ways of understanding the formal techniques and thematic innovations of modernist literature. 300 word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Ajitpaul Mangat (ajitpaul@buffalo.edu).

American Literature Special Sessions

  • “Age and American Literature”–Deadline: March 1, 2015
    • Moving beyond childhood studies, this panel considers age more broadly as an analytic for reading American literature. How do literary works reify or resist age norms? 250-word abstracts by 1 March 2015; Sari Edelstein (sari.edelstein@umb.edu).
  • “Poetry and Dissent in American Public Life”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • This session seeks to theorize, document, and enact poetry as a practice of dissent in American public life. All periods welcome. 250-word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Nate Mickelson (nate.mickelson@guttman.cuny.edu).
  • “Politics of Friendship in American Literature”Deadline: March 8, 2015
    • Papers might engage with critical race studies, queer studies, children’s and YA literature, and/ or issues of public authorship and collaboration. 250-word abstracts; short bios by 8 March 2015; Kristen Proehl (kproehl@brockport.edu).
  • TC Ecocriticism and Environmental Humanities: “Critical Grounds: The South and Sustainability”–Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • The U.S. South and the global imperative of sustainability in literature, film, and other media. 300-word abstract and a brief bio to Ted Atkinson by 15 March 2015; Ted Atkinson (TAtkinson@english.msstate.edu).

Interdisciplinary

  • “19th-Century Science Fiction”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • Papers sought on nineteenth-century science fiction; proto-science fiction; reconsiderations of texts as aligned with the emergence of the genre; historical/cultural influences and impacts. 300-word abstract and 1-page CV by 15 March 2015; Jessica Kuskey (jkuskey@ucsc.edu).
  • “Autobiography and Emotional Publics”Deadline: March 1, 2015
    • How does autobiography arouse, shape, or validate public manifestations of emotions? How do these life writing texts participate in the circulation of particular emotions? 250-word abstracts by 1 March 2015; Rocío G. Davis (rgdavis@unav.es).
  • GS Travel Writing: “Theorizing Travel Literature: Issues of Genre, Form, and Representation”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • This panel will consider how travel narratives test generic conventions, experiment with form, or push the limits of representation. 250-word abstract and c.v. by 15 March 2015; Katarina Gephardt (kgephard@kennesaw.edu).
  • Linguistics and Literature: “Syntax and Poetry”Deadline: March 6, 2015
    • How do poets employ and challenge the conventions of syntax for poetic effect? Papers providing a stylistic exploration of the syntax of poetry. 300-word abstract to donhardy@unr.edu by 6 March 2015; Donald E. Hardy (donhardy@unr.edu).
  • “Narrative Threads”Deadline: March 10, 2015
    • Textile objects (needlework, embroidery) may also be textual objects. Approaches might include textiles and texts as artifacts of industrialization, imperialism, and/or globalization. Abstracts by 10 March 2015; Lauren Miskin (lmiskin@smu.edu).
  • Society for Critical Exchange
    • “Communities of Theory”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • In what sense do theorists form a community or communities at the present time? What defines such groups? How do they function? What makes one their member? abstracts by 15 March 2015; Jeffrey R. Di Leo (dileo@symploke.org).
    • “Theory Renaissance?”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • The comeback of theory in the 21st century? What are the specific forces behind theory’s return? Participants will consider Vincent Leitch’s 2014 book Literary Criticism in the 21st Century. abstracts by 15 March 2015; Jeffrey R. Di Leo (dileo@symploke.org)
  • Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing
    • “Secret Archives: Privacy, Control and Access”Deadline: March 15, 2015
      • “Archive stories” about the difficulties to access certain collections, and what these stories tell us about power and control. 250-word abstracts by 15 March 2015; Lise Jaillant (L.Jaillant@uea.ac.uk).
  • TC Philosophy and Literature: “Relations/Legacies: Brecht, Benjamin, Adorno”Deadline: March 15, 2015
    • Artistic, critical, philosophical relations among Brecht, Benjamin, and Adorno before and during the exile years and the legacy of these tense relations. 250 word abstract by 15 March 2015; Rebecca Comay (comay@chass.utoronto.ca) and Robert Kaufman (robkaufman@berkeley.edu).
  • TC Sexuality Studies
    • “Queer Proximities”Deadline: February 23, 2015
      • Explorations of the sensorium; texture, sensation, affect, touch; spacing and relationscape; distance and distancing, nearness, seclusion; relationalities, withdrawal, fusion; transpecies, human; bonds and bonding, intimacy, attachment/detachment. 250-word abstracts, CVs by 23 February 2015; Scott Herring (tsherrin@indiana.edu) and Carla Freccero (freccero@ucsc.edu).
    • “Vaqueer@s”Deadline: February 23, 2015
      • Queer, borderlands; vaquero/a/cowboy/girl culture, gender, race, sexualities; Texas, US-Mexican intimacies and frictions; queer rurality, animals (especially cattle, horses), work; literature, media, performance. 250 word abstracts, CVs by 23 February 2015; Carla A. Freccero (freccero@ucsc.edu) and Ramón H. Rivera-Servera (r-rivera-servera@northwestern.edu).
  • TM Literary and Cultural Theory: “Theory Now”Deadline: March 8, 2015
    • Where is theory in relation to posthumanism or the post-humanities, new materialisms, object-oriented ontology, the neural turn and other recent developments? 500 word abstracts by 8 March 2015; Lauren J. Lacey (llacey@edgewood.edu) and Tilottama Rajan (trajan@sympatico.ca).
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